Split Ray Feature Car

It isn’t a Corvette!

The 2017 Nashville Good Guys show featured one of my favorite custom Corvettes of all time. Unfortunately, or luckily depending on your position on custom Corvettes, this was not a Corvette at all! Confused? So was I for awhile when I first saw this Vette.

It appeared to be a close to original Corvette but at the same time it just didn’t look right, it looked better! After close examination, it appeared to be bigger, maybe wider and the interior looked similar to a late model Corvette.

At this point I thought is as a converted C5 or C6 with a Sting Ray body or body panels adapted to it. No, it didn’t have the tell tale windshield frame of a newer car. Then it hit me, the car had been widened!

I think the grill is a little to big. It should not be big top to bottom but this is being very picky.

After talking with the owner, I learned that I was still not correct. The car was not even a real Corvette. It is a one-off, one of a kind custom built machine. Although most of the panels and parts for the car look very similar to a mid-year Sting Ray everything was custom built. Nothing on the car is unmolested Corvette.

The casual observer would likely not even notice that the emblems don’t proclaim the car as a Sting Ray, it is a “Split Ray”.

This gorgeous one of a kind Corvette has had six inches added to its width. It generally was added down the center of the car. This includes the front and rear windows which also had to be custom built and widened to keep the proportions correct.

The engine cover and new fake valve covers even create the allusion of an old 327 cu. in. engine.

Even the side badges were custom built to proclaim the car’s new LS9 power plant.

The interior is much roomier than a real Sting Ray and the Split Rays interior design screams new Corvette.

The triple taillights are a through back to the traditional custom modification from back in the day. However, this change also helps mask the car’s extra width.

 

 

The side pipes appear original but again, close inspection reveals they too are custom designs with a strong resemblance to the originals.

Although the wheels do pay homage to the original knock offs they are clearly larger and not vintage Sting Ray.

 

 

The 1967 style hood looks correct but I would have preferred the 1967 side vent panels to match. The car’s 1965/66 side vent panels destroy the allusion of an original car. This is a very minor complaint. This modification was actually very popular back in the day. I think there were more 1967 big block hoods on  Sting Ray Corvettes of all years than original hoods back in the day.

What do you think? Would you want a Spit Ray or a Sting Ray to drive around today?

 



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About the Author: I grew up and lived in Iowa for nearly 40 years before moving to Southern California and now live in Tennessee. I have been into cars since I was old enough to remember. I don't have a brand loyalty although I do prefer American Muscle especially the 1969/1970 NASCAR Aero Cars. (Check our our www.TalladegaSpoilerRegistry.com page) As long as it has four wheels on it I get excited. Few men are lucky enough to be able to share their passion for cars with the woman they love. Fortunately, my wife Katriana is also a gear head and many of our activities revolve around the cars. We have a small collection that includes at least one car from each of the Big Three. Katrina prefers all original cars while I like to modify them so we have a few of each. When we aren't playing with cars we are out with our miniature donkeys. You can see more about that part of our lives at http://www.LegendaryFarms.com.

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